William Guthrie on the duty of self-denial

Posted at Reformed Covenanter:

Lastly, If ye have gotten Christ ye will be much employed about the work of mortification and self-denial. When Jesus comes unto a soul, He works in that soul much self-loathing and self-abhorrence. The soul that hath gotten Christ will say with the apostle, “Those things that I counted gain, I now count loss for Christ.”

This leads me to another point of doctrine, which is this: That the soul that is beloved of God, and for whom Christ hath given Himself, is much engaged in the exercise of self-denial. The apostle says not, “That the Lord loved me, and gave Himself for me, on account of anything that was in me;” but, “Christ loved me, and gave Himself for me, even me, who was a persecutor; for me, who was a blasphemer; for me, who was such and such.” How much, then, was this minister, Paul, engaged in the exercise of self-denial?

Again, you may observe that the soul that is loved of God, and for whom Christ hath given Himself, will be much in the exercise of mortification; or it is a duty lying on all those who are loved of God, and for whom Christ hath given Himself, to be much engaged in this work of mortification and self-denial. Ye must not think that this is only the work of ministers and men in eminent stations, to deny themselves; no, you have Jesus Christ Himself saying, “If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me.” But that we may come to speak more particularly to the words, there is a threefold self that must be denied.

First, Natural self.
Secondly, Sinful self. And,
Thirdly, Regenerated and renewed self.

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